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Maritime & Admiralty Lawyer

scales of justiceIf you have suffered a serious injury while on a waterway, either as a passenger or a worker, the New York maritime and admiralty lawyers at Edelman, Krasin & Jaye can advise you about your legal rights to compensation. Because injuries of these types are subject to a distinct body of law known as admiralty law, there is simply no substitute for an attorney with specific expertise in the Jones Act, the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act and all other federal laws pertaining to harm sustained on or near the open water.

At EKJ Law, we pride ourselves on our decades of experience handling maritime cases for injured clients, and are well-equipped to pursue compensation on your behalf in this unique and complex area of law. For a free, no-obligation consultation about your case and your legal options, call us at: 1.800.469.7429.

The Jones Act and the protections it affords

In the early part of the 20th century, it became evident that offshore workers and seamen were in need of some form of protection in the event they were injured in the course of their employment. The Merchant Marine Act of 1920 resulted, with Section 27 emerging as perhaps the most frequently cited portion. Known as the Jones Act, this section affords seamen and others the ability to obtain monetary damage awards from ship owners, crew members and captains whose negligence was the cause of the harm they sustained.

The Jones Act safeguards the rights of those working on:

  • Tugboats
  • Ferries
  • Ocean-going ships
  • Commercial fishing boats
  • Oil rigs
  • Drilling platforms

The Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act

This federal statutory protection is extended to workers who sustain injuries while attending to their duties on waterways or while repairing, loading, building or unloading vessels. In addition, it provides remedies for individuals who contract diseases from performing those same categories of work.

In order to maximize your potential compensation, it is critical that you contact a maritime and admiralty lawyer with in-depth understanding of this very specific practice area. At Edelman, Krasin & Jaye, we have represented clients in maritime cases since the firm’s inception in 1952, and we stand prepared to carefully assess the facts of your case and craft the best legal strategy to procure maximum compensation for your injuries.

Death on the High Seas Act

Enacted in 1920, this statute is intended to allow for recovery of damages by a spouse or other dependent of a seaman killed in international waters due to the negligence of another or the unseaworthiness of a vessel. If you believe you may have a wrongful death claim that meets these criteria, the NY-based admiralty and maritime lawyers of EKJ Law have the experience and insight necessary to review your case and provide clear, honest explanations of your legal options.

In maritime cases, including those filed pursuant to the Jones Act and Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act, victims may be entitled to:

  • Past and future medical costs
  • Lost wages
  • Lost earning capacity
  • Pain and suffering
  • Funeral expenses
  • Childcare costs

Filing cruise ship injury lawsuits

Though intended to be relaxing, idyllic departures from everyday life, there are times when cruises turn tragic and injuries are sustained. Cruise ships are designated as “common carriers,” meaning that they have a special duty to passengers above and beyond mere reasonable care. When injuries or death occur on a cruise ship, legal claims can fall under maritime law, or other federal law and state law, depending on the circumstances. It may be possible to pursue compensation from the vessel’s owner, the charter company, the ship operator, or perhaps even the ticketing agency.

The kinds of incidents giving rise to cruise injury claims are quite varied, and can include:

  • Overboard falls
  • Cruise ship fire injuries
  • Docking accidents
  • Norovirus infections
  • Injuries caused by navigational mistakes
  • Pool accidents

The Long Island and New York maritime attorneys at Edelman, Krasin & Jaye will listen to the facts of your case, determine applicable law and begin building the most persuasive case possible on your behalf. Because cruise ship injuries can be extremely serious in nature, it is important that you begin the process of seeking recovery as soon as possible upon reaching shore.

As is also the case in many Jones Act and Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act matters, cruise ship injury victims are often pressured or coerced into making statements about the circumstances surrounding the harm sustained. This can often substantially compromise their ability to recover damages down the road. For that reason, we at Edelman, Krasin & Jaye urge you to contact us as soon as possible following the events in question.

NY maritime & admiralty lawyers at EKJ Law are on your side

Admiralty and maritime injury cases are unusually complex matters. They require comprehensive knowledge of the pertinent statutes and a personalized approach to client care. The personal injury attorneys of Edelman, Krasin & Jaye have built their careers on the belief that those harmed by the negligence of others deserve compassionate, tireless advocacy.

Individualized attention, honest guidance and round-the-clock accessibility to clients are all hallmarks of our practice. Our network of investigators, medical experts and economic loss analysts allows us to offer a level of representation that truly sets us apart from the competition.

At Edelman, Krasin & Jaye, your success is our success, and we strive daily to achieve the best possible outcomes for each of our clients. To schedule a confidential, no obligation, free consultation, call us at 1-800-469-7429. We look forward to examining the facts of your case and helping you explore all available options.

  1. Legal Information Institute, Admiralty: An Overview, http://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/admiralty 
  2. United States Department of Labor, The Longshore and Harbor Worker's Compensation Act (LHWCA), http://www.dol.gov/compliance.laws.comp.lhwca.htm